Each Purchase Helps Food Insecurity – Learn More

The Change Fashion Needs

It’s one thing to say you're sustainable.

A lot of fashion companies do that. It’s another to pull back the curtain and show it. That’s exactly what we hope to do. As we raise the bar for sustainability in apparel manufacturing, we want to evaluate and acknowledge the ways we can improve — while also celebrating the areas we’re pushing the industry.

General Rating for Sustainable Brands

The Hass Impact Score is an honest reflection of our progress, and we feature it on each product page. For everything we sell, we score ourselves based on the categories and methodologies from the Business of Fashion’s Sustainability Index and B Corp. We’ve created the following scales to measure how we’re doing.

 
5 - Leading

Demonstrating category leadership, although progress can still be made. Have policies and certifications for trust.

4 - Making Progress 

Policies and procedures in place. Showing progress and picking up momentum.

3 - Starting

Policies and procedures in place. Improvements starting to show.

2 - Below Standard

Some information disclosed, but progress is falling behind goals and industry standards for sustainable brands.

1 - Failing

Not acceptable for a sustainable brand.

 

Transparency

Fashion has a transparency problem. Byzantine supply chains make it challenging to know where exactly a material is coming from, making accountability toward social and environmental responsibility nearly impossible. A leading sustainable company should show traceable supply chains and publicly disclose their suppliers and the certifications that validate positive impact.

 

5 - LEADING
  • Full supply chain traceability and discloses suppliers.
  • Uses verified HIGG Index FEM and FSLM tools for Tier 1 and Tier 2 suppliers and publicly discloses progress. 
  • Publish methodology.
  • 3rd-party certifications such as Certified B-Corporation. 
  • Blockchain powered for full transactional transparency across the supply chain.
  • Company has met targets related to sustainability & social impact.
  • Company has a formal donation commitment and donates 2%+ of revenue to charity during previous fiscal year.

 

4 - MAKING PROGRESS
  • Partial supply chain traceability and disclosed suppliers.
  • Uses the HIGG Index FEM and FSLM tools for Tier 1 and Tier 2 suppliers and publicly discloses progress. 
  • 3rd-party certifications such as B-Corporation. 
  • Company publicly discloses progress toward internally set targets related to sustainability & social impact.
  • Company has a formal donation commitment and donates 1-1.9% of revenue to charity during previous fiscal year.

 

3 - STARTING
  • Higg Index tools deployed at at least Tier 1 but not publicly disclosed.
  • Has begun 3rd party certification processes but not completed them. 
  • Company has set internal social & environmental goals.
  • Company makes public charitable giving donations, but does not have a formal donations commitment.

 

2 - BELOW STANDARD
  • Company makes claims to transparency but has not employed any sort of methodology to hold themselves accountable. 
  • No certification processes, has set goals but does not track progress.

 

1 - FAILING
  • No initiatives.

Emissions

 

5 - LEADING
  • Measures verified emissions and publishes results. 
  • Offsets 100% of scopes 1,2 and 3 via verified offsets.
  • Has met prior reduction targets.
  • Has set science based targets to further reduce. 
  • Has 3rd-party certifications (such as Climate Neutral Certified).
  • Tracks and verifies emissions within the supply chain. 
  • Material produces less emissions than other industry choices. 
  • Advocates for climate positive legislation through lobbying events.

 

4 - MAKING PROGRESS
  • Measures emissions and publishes results.
  • Offsets 100% of scopes 1,2 and 3.
  • Has met reduction targets.
  • Tracks emissions within the supply chain. 
  • Chosen material produces average amount of GHG emissions compared to other textiles 
  • Advocates for climate positive legislation via sign on letters.

 

3 - STARTING
  • Has begun 3rd party certification process. 
  • Offsets scope 1 and 2 emissions. 
  • Has set reduction targets. 
  • Chosen material produces average amount of GHG emissions compared to other textiles. 
  • Call consumer attention to climate emissions in their marketing materials.

 

2 - BELOW STANDARD
  • Company makes claims about reduced emissions but has no standards to back it up. No certification processes, no LCA backed data.

 

1 - FAILING
  • No initiatives.

Water & Chemicals

Fashion uses a lot of water. The industry is the second-largest consumer of water, and toxic textile dyes and the release of microfibers make fashion the second largest water polluter. Natural and organic fibers, however, can use up to 70 percent less water than synthetic and non-organic fabrics. And sustainable brands can harness natural, non-toxic dyes to ensure their garments are processed in a way that is safe and sustainable for people and the planet. Don’t just take their word for it — third-party certifications can validate the use of organic textiles and safe processing.

 

5 - LEADING
  • Fiber is not known to release microfibers into waterways — 90%+ organic/natural materials.
  • Fiber is in top 10% of textiles known to reduce water consumption.
  • Fiber is in the 10% of textiles known to not release excess nutrients into waterways. 
  • Company has worked with supply chain to measure and implement better water practices. 
  • 3rd party certifications such as GOTS and MADE SAFE®.
  • Advocates for water legislation through lobbying events.

 

4 - MAKING PROGRESS
  • Fiber is not known to release microfibers into waterways — 75%+ organic/natural materials.
  • Fiber is in top 25% of textiles known to reduce water consumption.
  • Fiber is in the 25% of textiles known to not release excess nutrients into waterways. 
  • Company has worked with supply chain to measure water consumption.
  • Company in process of obtaining 3rd party certifications. 
  • Company advocates for water legislation via sign on letters.
  • Fiber consumes average amount of water compared to other industry textiles.

 

3 - STARTING
  • Fiber is not known to release microfibers into waterways — 50%+ organic/natural materials.
  • Fiber is in top 50% of textiles known to reduce water consumption.
  • Fiber is in the 50% of textiles known to not release excess nutrients into waterways. 
  • Has performed simplified life cycle analyses to understand water impact of their materials.
  • Calls consumer attention to water issues.

 

2 - BELOW STANDARD
  • Company makes claims regarding water consumption and eutrophication but has no LCA data or targets that they’re tracking.

 

1 - FAILING
  • No initiatives.

Materials

Synthetic materials, like polyester and nylon, are byproducts of petroleum. In fact, oil-based fabrics are the most common in the world — in 2019, the industry produced 60 million tons of them. Extracting and burning oil is incredibly resource intensive — it’s also the primary cause of climate change. Sustainable companies know that organic and natural fibers, as well as recycled polyester, are essential to making fashion less environmentally costly. And the fabrics themselves should come from regenerative sources that measure their climate impact. About 85 percent of textiles end up in the landfill, so fabrics that safely and quickly biodegrade are also essential to sustainability. 

 

5 - LEADING
  • Product is comprised of primarily organic fibers (90%+). 
  • Product does not use virgin polyester.
  • Company focuses on sustainably sourced materials over conventional (lenzing modal vs. generic, organic cotton vs. conventional). 
  • Materials sourced from a regenerative source and the climate positive effects are measured.
  • Product will biodegrade within one year.
  • Has worked with segments of the supply chain to improve impacts of materials. 
  • Has worked with the supply chain to certify materials and facilities according to certification standards.
  • Company advocates for safer materials via lobby days and engaging other industry brands.

 

4 - MAKING PROGRESS
  • Material is comprised of primarily organic fibers (75%+). 
  • Material sourced from an organic or socially responsible certified source (GOTS, Fair Trade®, Lenzing, RAS, etc).
  • Company has worked with segments of the supply chain to measure, track, and verify impacts of materials. 
  • Product will biodegrade within five years.
  • Company advocates for safer materials via sign on letters (minimal lift).

 

3 - STARTING
  • Material is comprised of primarily organic fibers (50%+). 
  • Biodegradability tests have been done on the product and/or are in progress.

 

2 - BELOW STANDARD
  • Company claims to have safer materials but has no verified LCA or third-party certifications to back their claims up.

 

1 - FAILING
  • No initiatives.

Worker Rights

Many fashion companies make their clothes in factories with terrible human rights violations, including unfair wages, unsafe conditions, forced child labor, and slavery. Sustainable fashion companies, through B Corp or other verifications, must show their business upholds egalitarian values throughout every step of their supply chain. 

 

5 - LEADING
  • B-Corp score in Supply Chain category is excelling 5.9+ points out of 8.6. 
  • Entities within material supply chain have been verified to uphold their code of conduct. 
  • Supply chain verified to not engage in forced or child labor. 
  • Material supply chain audited and verified to uphold social rights standard through certifications such as GOTS or FairTrade®.
  • Workers in the majority of the material supply chain verified to be paid a living wage. 
  • Premiums paid on material purchases.
  • Material production and farming is local to company headquarters.
  • 50%+ of company directors and managers identify as female.
  • 30%+ of company directors and managers identify as from another underrepresented social group.

 

4 - MAKING PROGRESS
  • B-Corp score in Supply Chain category is good 2.95 - 5.9 out of 8.6 points.
  • Company has requested copies of each supplier’s code of conduct and policies such as forced and child labor.
  • Material supply chain pursuing certifications such as GOTS or FairTrade.
  • Workers in tier 1 and tier 2 of  the material supply chain verified to be paid a living wage. 
  • Material production local to company.
  • 40-49% of company directors and managers identify as female.
  • 20-29% of company directors and managers identify as from another underrepresented social group.

 

3 - STARTING
  • B-Corp score in supply chain category is average .3 - 2.95 points out of 8.6. 
  • Company has requested policies from suppliers such as forced labor, child labor, and code of conduct but is not demanding or verifying these documents.
  • Material supply chain is following  GOTS or FairTrade practices but not pursuing certification.
  • Workers in the majority of the material supply chain verified to be paid a living wage. 
  • Company aiming to move a percentage of production to local sources.
  • 25-39% of company directors and managers identify as female.
  • 10-24% of company directors and managers identify as from another underrepresented social group.

 

2 - BELOW STANDARD
  • Company claims to request and verify documentation around code of conduct, forced, and child labor but has no processes in place to formally track, measure, or enforce these standards. 
  • Claims to be producing locally but imports the majority of materials and finished goods from international sources.

 

1 - FAILING
  • No initiatives.

Waste

The fashion industry generates 40 million tonnes of textile waste every year. That figure doesn’t include packaging, most of which is single-use plastic. A leading sustainable company implements a circular, closed-loop system that’s actually verified to work, while setting and meeting waste reduction targets and harnessing upcycled and biodegradable materials and zero-waste processes.

5 - LEADING
  • B-Corp score in Supply Chain category is excelling 5.9+ points out of 8.6. 
  • Entities within material supply chain have been verified to uphold their code of conduct. 
  • Supply chain verified to not engage in forced or child labor. 
  • Material supply chain audited and verified to uphold social rights standard through certifications such as GOTS or FairTrade®.
  • Workers in the majority of the material supply chain verified to be paid a living wage. 
  • Premiums paid on material purchases.
  • Material production and farming is local to company headquarters.
  • 50%+ of company directors and managers identify as female.
  • 30%+ of company directors and managers identify as from another underrepresented social group.

 

4 - MAKING PROGRESS
  • B-Corp score in Supply Chain category is good 2.95 - 5.9 out of 8.6 points.
  • Company has requested copies of each supplier’s code of conduct and policies such as forced and child labor.
  • Material supply chain pursuing certifications such as GOTS or FairTrade.
  • Workers in tier 1 and tier 2 of  the material supply chain verified to be paid a living wage. 
  • Material production local to company.
  • 40-49% of company directors and managers identify as female.
  • 20-29% of company directors and managers identify as from another underrepresented social group.

 

3 - STARTING
  • B-Corp score in supply chain category is average .3 - 2.95 points out of 8.6. 
  • Company has requested policies from suppliers such as forced labor, child labor, and code of conduct but is not demanding or verifying these documents.
  • Material supply chain is following  GOTS or FairTrade practices but not pursuing certification.
  • Workers in the majority of the material supply chain verified to be paid a living wage. 
  • Company aiming to move a percentage of production to local sources.
  • 25-39% of company directors and managers identify as female.
  • 10-24% of company directors and managers identify as from another underrepresented social group.

 

2 - BELOW STANDARD
  • Company claims to request and verify documentation around code of conduct, forced, and child labor but has no processes in place to formally track, measure, or enforce these standards. 
  • Claims to be producing locally but imports the majority of materials and finished goods from international sources.

 

1 - FAILING
  • No initiatives.